Knoster’s Model for Managing Complex Change is a great strategy for instructional coaches. As coaches, we help teachers to make changes and change can be difficult. I keep Knoster’s Model in mind when working with teachers to help ensure lasting change. What to look for in this post : An overview of Knoster’s Model for Managing Complex Change Using Knoster’s Model as an instructional coach If you prefer to hear me talk through this, here is a video featuring all of this content: [0:18] An overview of Knoster’s Model for Managing Complex Change For there to be successful change, people have to be clear on the vision. They have to know what is expected and why a change needs to be made. Resources have to be available for success, and they have to have the skills and the motivation to change. A clear action plan will help them to make changes step by step. What I love about the above table is it shows you exactly what result you can expect if a specific piece is missing. [1:06] Using Kno...
  It is common for instructional coaches to provide feedback for teachers after classroom observations. But it can be an awkward conversation if you start giving feedback the teacher isn't ready to receive. That's why " Bless, Address, and Press " is such an important skill to have among your instructional coaching strategies. This post talks about one type of feedback, "Press," that you can provide to teachers in order to push them to grow and improve teaching and learning. You can certainly use some of these things as a classroom teacher to give effective feedback to students. In this post, however, we are specifically talking about what that looks like for instructional coaching. This post contains affiliate links. As an Amazon Associate, I earn from qualifying purchases. If you choose to purchase after clicking a link, I may receive a commission at no extra cost to you. What to look for in this post : Instructional coach feedback: Press How to choose wha...
It is common for instructional coaches to provide feedback for teachers after classroom observations. But it can be an awkward conversation if you start giving feedback the teacher isn't ready to receive. That's why " Bless, Address, and Press " is such an important skill to have among your instructional coaching strategies. This post talks about one type of feedback, "Address," that you can provide to teachers in order to narrow the focus of your reflection time together and improve teaching and learning. You can certainly use some of these things as a classroom teacher to give effective feedback to students. In this post, however, we are specifically talking about what that looks like for instructional coaching. What to look for in this post : Instructional coach feedback: Address How to address in instructional coaching if you see many issues that need to be addressed Moving forward in the instructional coaching relationship after providing Address feedba...