It is important to keep performing your roles and responsibilities as an instructional coach, even if you come up against teachers who seem uninterested in working with you. You never know who is watching and may want to be a part of your work as an instructional coach. In addition, you have to be mindful of how many teachers you can effectively coach at one time. Be sure to set realistic limits for yourself in order to ensure success! What to look for in this post : Teaching and coaching resistant teachers How many teachers to coach at one time If you prefer to hear me talk through this, here are two videos featuring all of this content: Reaching and Coaching Resistant Teachers Instructional coaching is intimidating. You have to know a lot, and you have to reach a lot of teachers. At my school, I am responsible for supporting around 150 teachers. Sometimes it can feel disappointing, because you may notice that not all teachers are equally willing to work with you. I wanted, however,...
  Know your content knowledge. As an instructional coach, I believe you need at least a little bit of content knowledge that relates to the teachers you are working with. What to look for in this post : Strategies versus content knowledge Tips for decreasing overwhelm related to content knowledge If you prefer to hear me talk through this, here are two videos featuring all of this content: Strategies Versus Content Knowledge When I first interviewed for an instructional coach position, they asked about strategies I would use. The position was for K-12 math, so I listed a couple of strategies but also told them I would need to make sure I revisited math content. It had been a while since I had done calculus and algebra. The interviewer told me to focus on strategies. They told me that the content did not matter, and that I could coach teachers without knowing the content. In that moment, I decided that I disagreed with that statement. I have now been coaching for over six years, and I s...
  Responding to teachers effectively is an important part of instructional coaching. As an instructional coach, your response to a teacher’s problems can make a huge difference. Sometimes, it is necessary to take some time before responding to their concern or complaint. In addition, I share a strategy that I use when teachers are not yet ready to take my suggestions. What to look for in this post : You don’t have to have all the answers as an instructional coach Take time before responding to teachers Be aware of teachers’ resistance If you prefer to hear me talk through this, here are two videos featuring all of this content: You Don’t Have to Have All the Answers as an Instructional Coach Sometimes as instructional coaches, we feel pressure to have answers right away. We are supposed to be experts and have all the answers, but there is a lot of power in telling a teacher that you are going to take some time. You can let them know that they have given you a lot to think about and you...